“The Daughter of Time” by Josephine Tey

“The Daughter of Time” by Josephine Tey

The Daughter of Time

by Josephine Tey

The Library Book Club meeting for this book was held Thursday, July 13th, 2017, at 6:30 in the entry foyer.

Scotland Yard Inspector Alan Grant is intrigued by a portrait of Richard III. Could such a sensitive face actually belong to a heinous villain — a king who killed his brother’s children to secure his crown? Grant seeks what kind of man Richard was and who in fact killed the princes in the tower.

Ratings and Reviews from the Librarians

Cathy rated it ★★★★.

Dairy Queen by Catherine Gilbert Murdock

Dairy Queen by Catherine Gilbert Murdock

Dairy Queen

by Catherine Gilbert Murdock

The Library Book Club meeting for this book will be Thursday, October 19, 2017, at 6:30 in the entry foyer.

A limited number of book club reading copies will be available for checkout from the circulation desk about a month prior to the meeting.

When you don’t talk, there’s a lot of stuff that ends up not getting said. Harsh words indeed, from Brian Nelson of all people. But, D. J. can’t help admitting, maybe he’s right.

When you don’t talk, there’s a lot of stuff that ends up not getting said. Stuff like why her best friend, Amber, isn’t so friendly anymore. Or why her little brother, Curtis, never opens his mouth. Why her mom has two jobs and a big secret. Why her college-football-star brothers won’t even call home. Why her dad would go ballistic if she tried out for the high school football team herself. And why Brian is so, so out of her league.

When you don’t talk, there’s a lot of stuff that ends up not getting said. Welcome to the summer that fifteen-year-old D. J. Schwenk of Red Bend, Wisconsin, learns to talk, and ends up having an awful lot of stuff to say.

book 1 in the Dairy Queen series

Ratings and Reviews from the Librarians

Miranda rated it ★★★★1/2 and said, “A great story about cultivating relationships, making your own decisions, and growing up.”

Bekka rated it ★★★★ and said, “I really enjoyed this book! D.J. is a strong, compelling character and I thoroughly liked her! She’s got a very sweet aspect about her, and I could empathize with her insecurities and self-image. The plot was great and had some nice twists. I’m not really a football fan, but Murdock’s writing is so great that I found myself anxious with anticipation at the outcome of the big game. I also enjoyed all the passages about the training regime and how much effort D.J. and Brian put into their workouts. The romance was quite realistic, and much more enjoyable than many YA books I’ve read. This is a great read that would appeal to both teens and adults alike!”

Patty rated it ★★★★

The Yearling by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

The Yearling by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

The Yearling

by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

The Library Book Club meeting for this book will be Thursday, September 21, 2017, at 6:30 in the entry foyer.

A limited number of book club reading copies will be available for checkout from the circulation desk about a month prior to the meeting.

Young Jody adopts an orphaned fawn he calls Flag and makes it a part of his family and his best friend. But life in the Florida backwoods is harsh, and so, as his family fights off wolves, bears, and even alligators, and faces failure in their tenuous subsistence farming, Jody must finally part with his dear animal friend.

Ratings and Reviews from the Librarians

Cathy rated it ★★★★

Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

Don Quixote

by Manuel De Cervantes Saavedra

The Library Book Club meeting for this book was held Thursday, June 15, 2017, at 6:30 in the entry foyer.

Don Quixote has become so entranced by reading chivalric romances, that he determines to become a knight-errant himself. In the company of his faithful squire, Sancho Panza, his exploits blossom in all sorts of wonderful ways. While Quixote’s fancy often leads him astray – he tilts at windmills, imagining them to be giants – Sancho acquires cunning and a certain sagacity. Sane madman and wise fool, they roam the world together, and together they have haunted readers’ imaginations for nearly four hundred years.

Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen

Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen

Sense and Sensibiity

by Jane Austen

The Library Book Club meeting for this book was held Thursday, May 18, 2017, at 6:30 in the entry foyer.

Marianne Dashwood wears her heart on her sleeve, and when she falls in love with the dashing but unsuitable John Willoughby she ignores her sister Elinor’s warning that her impulsive behaviour leaves her open to gossip and innuendo. Meanwhile Elinor, always sensitive to social convention, is struggling to conceal her own romantic disappointment, even from those closest to her. Through their parallel experience of love—and its threatened loss—the sisters learn that sense must mix with sensibility if they are to find personal happiness in a society where status and money govern the rules of love.

Ratings and Reviews from the Librarians

Cathy rated it ★★★★

Miranda rated it ★★★★

Patty rated it ★★★

El Deafo by Cece Bell

El Deafo by Cece Bell

El Deafo

by Cece Bell

The Library Book Club meeting for this book was held Thursday, April 20, 2017, at 6:30 in the entry foyer.

Going to school and making new friends can be tough. But going to school and making new friends while wearing a bulky hearing aid strapped to your chest? That requires superpowers! In this funny, poignant graphic novel memoir, author/illustrator Cece Bell chronicles her hearing loss at a young age and her subsequent experiences with the Phonic Ear, a very powerful–and very awkward–hearing aid. The Phonic Ear gives Cece the ability to hear–sometimes things she shouldn’t–but also isolates her from her classmates. She really just wants to fit in and find a true friend, someone who appreciates her as she is. After some trouble, she is finally able to harness the power of the Phonic Ear and become “El Deafo, Listener for All.” And more importantly, declare a place for herself in the world and find the friend she’s longed for.

Ratings and Reviews from the Librarians

Cathy rated it ★★★★★

Bekka rated it ★★★★★ and said “Very well done! I appreciated the humor as well as the emotional times. The art is charming – very cartoony and cute. I love how they all have bunny ears! This is a great story for both kids and adults. Highly Recommended.”

Vivian rated it ★★★ and said “What I would like to find out is, are children picking this up to read without being led to it by adults, and if so, what about it keeps them reading it? Aside from it’s obvious exposure to what it feels like to be different and that being different can be triggered by circumstances beyond one’s control, which is the “swallow this pill” purpose of the book, why has this book caught on? Here’s my quick answer. It’s really about friendships — different kinds of friendships and social situations — and every body has experience with this. Have you had the “you’re my project” kind of friend (or big me, little you)? Just saying, she nails the “friends” things on so many levels. And then there’s the whole “dealing with reality by creating an alternate reality” thing going, which she also nails. There are lots of springboard opportunities in her story to talk about assumptions we make and communication and taking social cues, which is why I think it’s good that the book is going the rounds in adult circles. It gives us a way to start some important conversations.”

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

The Handmaid's Tale

by Margaret Atwood

The Library Book Club meeting for this book was held Thursday, March 16, 2017, at 6:30 in the entry foyer.

Book club reading copies were available for checkout from the circulation desk about a month prior to the meeting.

Offred is a Handmaid in the Republic of Gilead. She may leave the home of the Commander and his wife once a day to walk to food markets whose signs are now pictures instead of words because women are no longer allowed to read. She must lie on her back once a month and pray that the Commander makes her pregnant, because in an age of declining births, Offred and the other Handmaids are valued only if their ovaries are viable. Offred can remember the years before, when she lived and made love with her husband, Luke; when she played with and protected her daughter; when she had a job, money of her own, and access to knowledge. But all of that is gone now.

The War that Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

The War that Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

The War that Saved My Life

by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

The Library Book Club meeting for this book was on Thursday, April 19, 2018, at 6:30 in the entry foyer.

A limited number of book club reading copies were available for checkout from the circulation desk about a month prior to the meeting.

An exceptionally moving story of triumph against all odds set during World War 2, from the acclaimed author of Jefferson’s Sons and for fans of Number the Stars.

Nine-year-old Ada has never left her one-room apartment. Her mother is too humiliated by Ada’s twisted foot to let her outside. So when her little brother Jamie is shipped out of London to escape the war, Ada doesn’t waste a minute—she sneaks out to join him.

So begins a new adventure of Ada, and for Susan Smith, the woman who is forced to take the two kids in. As Ada teaches herself to ride a pony, learns to read, and watches for German spies, she begins to trust Susan—and Susan begins to love Ada and Jamie. But in the end, will their bond be enough to hold them together through wartime? Or will Ada and her brother fall back into the cruel hands of their mother?

This masterful work of historical fiction is equal parts adventure and a moving tale of family and identity—a classic in the making.

Newbery Honor book in 2016

Ratings and Reviews from the Librarians

Bekka rated it ★★★★★ and said “Really beautiful book! A tragic, but ultimately triumphant, story. Ada is a great heroine!”

Cathy rated it ★★★★ and said, “I adore this book both for the story it tells and the stories it doesn’t. The story it tells of crippled Ada, her abusive mother, and her and her brother’s redemption by semi-reclusive Susan during a harrowing war is wonderfully told. The stories hinted at could have been quickly outlined, but were given just enough form to leave me asking, ‘What made her mother into this cruel monster?’ ‘What happened between Susan and her family?’ ‘Will they be able to survive the dangers and hard times ahead?’ I’m enjoying flushing out these other stories in my mind. And in truth, they are other stories. Spelling out the details would only have detracted from Ada’s tale, and Ada’s tale needs no help. It can stand on it’s own, as can she.”

Miranda rated it ★★★★ and said, “When I think about WWII, I think about concentration camps, Pearl Harbor, and the Holocaust. This book brought light to another part of the war, and specifically to a young brother and sister living on the edge of society. I felt much for Ada and her brother and all of the issues they faced. It was interesting to see how the author portrayed their emotional baggage and the ways that it affected them and how they coped. I can see how this can be a great read for older tweens, but I don’t think that younger kids will be able to pick up on all of the subtleties and exactly what they were going through.”

Lorna rated it ★★★★ and said, “4 1/2 stars. I loved the 1st person narrative and the way it brought out Ada’s vulnerability and fragileness, yet her courage and determination shine through. It was a high interest story and the chapters just melted into one another as I wanted to just keep going with it. The ending was a tad over the top with sentimentality but it was uplifting and poignant.”

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

All the Light We Cannot See

by Anthony Doerr

The Library Book Club meeting for this book will be Thursday, November 16, 2017, at 6:30 in the entry foyer.

Book club reading copies will be available for checkout from the circulation desk about a month prior to the meeting.

Marie-Laure lives with her father in Paris near the Museum of Natural History, where he works as the master of its thousands of locks. When she is six, Marie-Laure goes blind and her father builds a perfect miniature of their neighborhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. When Marie-Laure is twelve, the Nazis occupy Paris, and father and daughter flee to the walled citadel of Saint-Malo, where Marie-Laure’s reclusive great-uncle lives in a tall house by the sea. With them they carry what might be the museum’s most valuable and dangerous jewel.

In a mining town in Germany, the orphan Werner grows up with his younger sister, enchanted by a crude radio they find. Werner becomes an expert at building and fixing these crucial new instruments, a talent that wins him a place at a brutal academy for Hitler Youth, then a special assignment to track the resistance. More and more aware of the human cost of his intelligence, Werner travels through the heart of the war and, finally, into Saint-Malo, where his story and Marie-Laure’s converge.

Pulitzer Prize for Fiction 2015

Ratings and Reviews from the Librarians

Lorna rated it ★★★★★ and said, “Yes. Finally. I’ve been waiting for a book like this. Everything was so good – the writing, characters, the story, the sense of time and place – it was all good. The author’s approach is both scientific yet poetic. The book moves at the pace of a thriller yet I wanted to take my time reading it because each paragraph is so beautiful.”

Bekka rated it ★★★★★ and said, “This really was a good book, and one that stays with you after you’ve read it. It is a bit slow, in spite of the very short chapters, but its a very lyrical kind of slowness that allows you a chance to really get to know the characters and their world. All the characters were very well drawn, with no stereotypes to be found – not an easy thing to do when writing about the Nazis. This does have some definite teen cross-over appeal, since the two main characters are both older teens, but there are some harsh moments and some real heartbreaks. Its hard to even try and describe the writing style, which is literary without being difficult to read. Again, “lyrical” is the word that seems to fit, even when the author is telling us about some horrible things. The going back and forth between the characters and in time was very well done and not at all confusing. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and Highly Recommend it. And, hey, he’s an Idaho author!”

Cathy rated it ★★★★★ and said, “Lyrical, gripping, haunting, and absolutely, stunningly beautiful.”

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